Media & Outreach

National and international media are regularly reporting about scientific output from our research and we are always interested in sharing our scientific findings with the public. For a selection, see below.

Swiss Radio SRF1 – Interview with F. Altermatt

Swiss Radio SRF1 – Interview with F. Altermatt

Biodiversity is still declining. Florian Altermatt is interviewed in the broadcast “Morgengast” on the causes and consequences of biodiversity losses, about the state of biodiversity in Switzerland, and what can be done to promote biodiversity.

TELE Z TV - Report

TELE Z TV – Report

Environmental DNA (eDNA) is a novel tool to assess diversity in riverine ecosystems. This report shows how eDNA can be used to get information about which organisms live in and around rivers (in Swiss German) based on our study published in Nature Communications.

Swiss TV SRF - Science Broadcast “Einstein”

Swiss TV SRF – Science Broadcast “Einstein”

Riverine ecosystems in Switzerland are dramatically changing. In a thematic broadcast, “Einstein” of the Swiss TV SRF documents how biodiversity in the river Rhine is affected by anthropogenic activities. Florian Altermatt is interviewed about research from the Department of Aquatic Ecology at Eawag (project by a MSc student of Jukka Jokela) studying the significance of invasive species in aquatic systems (in Swiss German).

Deutschlandfunk – Interview with F. Altermatt

Deutschlandfunk – Interview with F. Altermatt

Interview in Science broadcast “Forschung Aktuell” at Deutschlandfunk on our study on eDNA-based biodiversity assessment in rivers published in Nature Communications (in German).

Swiss TV RSI  – Interview with F. Altermatt

Swiss TV RSI – Interview with F. Altermatt

Interview and report in the evening news of RSI on our study on eDNA-based biodiversity assessment in rivers published in Nature Communications (in Italian).

Radio RTS La Première – Interview with E. Fronhofer

Radio RTS La Première – Interview with E. Fronhofer

Deiner et al. (2016) show in a study published in Nature Communications that diversity in rivers can be assess using eDNA. Radio interview (RTS) of co-author Emanuel Fronhofer (in French).

Scientific American & BBC Wildlife

Scientific American & BBC Wildlife

Light-pollution is a global phenomenon with well-documented negative effects on the environment. In an experiment, we found a significantly reduced flight-to-light behavior of moths from light-polluted areas versus dark sky populations, suggesting an adaptive response of moth populations to this global environmental change (Altermatt & Ebert 2016 Biology Letters). This work received ample media coverage, among others in upcoming reports in Scientific American and BBC Wildlife.

Tagesanzeiger (major Swiss daily newspaper)

Tagesanzeiger (major Swiss daily newspaper)

Biodiversity is typically peaking at mid-altitudes. Scientists have long struggled to explain why this is the case. In a study in PNAS, we show in collaboration with scientists from EPFL that mid-altitudes host the largest number of species because the size and the connectedness of similar habitats are greatest there.

In an article and interview in the Tagesanzeiger, we report about this research.

Science – Moths evolve to avoid light

Science – Moths evolve to avoid light

Moths are fatally attracted to lights. Given the high level of light pollution, it has been speculated that this could trigger evolutionary responses. In a recent experiment, we for the first time report that multi-generational exposure to light pollution reduces moths’ propensity to fly to light. A report about our finding was published in the News section of Science.

Light Pollution – Reports in various Swiss and German newspapers

Light Pollution – Reports in various Swiss and German newspapers

Light-pollution is a global phenomenon with well-documented negative effects on the environment. In an experiment, we found a significantly reduced flight-to-light behavior of moths from light-polluted areas versus dark sky populations, suggesting an adaptive response of moth populations to this global environmental change (Altermatt & Ebert 2016 Biology Letters). This work received ample media coverage, among others in the Berliner Morgenpost, Rheinpfalz am Sonntag, Zentralschweiz am Sonntag.

Einstein

Swiss TV SRF – Science Broadcast “Einstein”

Biodiversity in Switzerland is declining dramatically. Based on a publication by the Forum Biodiversität, the broadcast “Einstein” of the Swiss TV SRF made a documentary on these declines. Florian Altermatt is interviewed on the loss of biodiversity in aquatic systems (in Swiss German).

Aqua Viva

Aqua Viva

Aquatic Ecosystems are affected by a multitude of anthropogenic factors, ranging from climate change, to invasive species and habitat modifications. In an Interview in Aqua Viva, published by one of most important organizations in the context of aquatic ecosystems in Switzerland, Florian Altermatt is asked about the state of aquatic ecosystems and the most pressing scientific questions. (in German).

Neue Zürcher Zeitung – Evolution makes invading species spread even faster

Neue Zürcher Zeitung – Evolution makes invading species spread even faster

Today, invasive animals and plants spread all around the globe. Predicting the dynamics of these invasions is of great ecological and socio-economical interest. By using laboratory microcosm experiments and computer simulations, we showed that rapid evolution makes invading species spread even faster. The study published in Nature Communications got ample media coverage, e.g. in the Neue Zürcher Zeitung.

Der Standard (Austrian daily newspaper)

Der Standard (Austrian daily newspaper)

Monitoring aquatic biodiversity is challenging for many reasons. We develop novel tools using environmental DNA (eDNA) which may revolutionize the way biodiversity is measured in aquatic systems. This is for example relevant for the monitoring of non-native species. A report in an Austrian newspaper is summarizing our work and possible applications.

Radio 1 – Interview with F. Altermatt

Radio 1 – Interview with F. Altermatt

Biodiversity is a key factor in preventing parasite epidemics. Altermatt & Ebert (2008) show in a study published in Ecology Letters that a high diversity of the host population is slowing down parasite epidemics. Radio interview (Radio 1) of Florian Altermatt (in Swiss German).